“play with it”, “quick feedback” and “binary debugging”

There is a lot of talk in the tech industry about the performance of developers. You can hear plenty about the role of a talent, experience, and motivation. “Be a talent scout!”, “We hire only seniors”, “Give them equity” …

https://blog.daftcode.pl/the-secret-of-high-performing-developers-c3c41966eca9

 

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Cache 22

I have recently had a discussion with one of the platform programmers (≈DBA) on a visit to a client. During my work there I added an adjustment to a process that I thought would improve accuracy with a minor impact on performance. Instead, the process came to a screeching halt, never returning an answer.

assume nothing

The root cause of this was an API misunderstanding – the code segment I added included an access to the DB. This DB query took the form of f(x) = y where both x and y are of a small, limited set, with a lot of repetition, and I assumed it would be cached. It was not. Continue reading “Cache 22”

Cache 22

Trinity

There is a known issue in world project management which translates well into the field of HPC. I first heard of is as the “Trinity Problem” – in every endeavor you always aspire to reach a result that is good, fast and cheap but can only fully achieve two of these (at best).

The reason is not the futility of man, but the inevitability of math. Given the wishes of Continue reading “Trinity”

Trinity

Geo-spatial in-memory caching using Rtree

Having to save a lot of geo-spatial data is a task rarely one passes without being scared for one’s life. Whether you are using a DB like postGIS, an in-memory data store like geoRedis or some other tool, handling geo-spatial data usually mean using RTree. Using RTree directly can ave some very positive effects on your system performance, so we thought we’ll let you in on this industry secret. Continue reading “Geo-spatial in-memory caching using Rtree”

Geo-spatial in-memory caching using Rtree

Logging Geo-Spatial-Data to ELK from Python

Kibana, on paper, offers a beautiful and easy way to inspect your geo data on a dashboard widget out of the box. This is all very well until you try to use that feature from python, only to find out that the Logstash lib automatically maps all of these geo-point type fields to string. Mapping in ES is no child’s play but even solving mapping issues* didn’t completely made the problem go away.

Continue reading “Logging Geo-Spatial-Data to ELK from Python”

Logging Geo-Spatial-Data to ELK from Python

Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 6: The Service

This post is part of a series. you’d probably like to read it from the beginning. Or check out the previous post in the series

If you have any experience with software developers, and I assume you do, you would know that we are prone to religion wars – windows vs. linux, python vs. js, visual studio vs. sublime vs. emacs vs. vim, even DC vs Marvel. Just name an idea or a product and sit back and watch us preach for hours on end why it’s either the most awesome thing in existence (or a steaming pile of out of date tyrannosaurus manure).

Taking that into account, it’s no surprise that a questions like “is SOA good or bad?” have been sending architects, engineers and programmers to the ring to try and punch a decision out of each other since the biblical times (someone had to engineer the shit out of those pyramids). The bell rings, we’re up! Continue reading “Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 6: The Service”

Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 6: The Service

better event-driven programming using flexible state

This is a true relic- the few who can spend the time and read it will be rewarded with the gift of understanding state. Using the complex example of…. a calculator:

At first glance, this approach seems to work just fine. Indeed, when you launch the calculator (available for download at <www.cuj.com/code>), you will certainly find out that most of the time it correctly adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides. What’s there not to like? However, play with the application for a while longer, and you’ll discover many corner cases in which the calculator provides misleading results, freezes, or crashes altogether.

Source: Who Moved My State? | Dr Dobb’s

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