Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 3: The embarrassingly parallel truth

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

This post is part of a series. you’d probably like to read it from the beginning. Or check out the previous post in the series

 

We are about to dig a hole. The hole will be 8 meter deep, 1m long and 1m wide. We know, from experience as a professional hole digger it will take us about 8 hours to dig all the way down. But this time there’s a difference – we will get some help.

together we stand

So our boss decided to get us some help, 7 people worth of help to be exact. But of course in life as in life, and nothing is free – as we are now eight, she wants us to dig the same hole in one hour. Trying to explain why this is not possible, you plead, you beg, you even say trying to dig that particular hole in an hour is like asking nine women to create a human baby in one month. Alas, the boss is the BOSS, and she will not budge – she wants that earth moved.

Continue reading “Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 3: The embarrassingly parallel truth”

Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 3: The embarrassingly parallel truth

on the importance Of standards

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

Not everyone has them in every field of their life (yes, that friend of yours with her choice of men is a fine example), but when it comes to software that doesn’t mean standards are any less important than that coding style you are slaving to keep, or the 400% test coverage you boast about so much.
Continue reading “on the importance Of standards”

on the importance Of standards

Link: The Anatomy of a Critical Security Bug

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

For those of you who don’t know, the last WordPress release was about more than just Emoji support. Yesterday a post was published on Post status about a talk by Andrew Nacin (the lead developer @ WordPress) on the subject explaining the ins and outs of a ~2 year old vulnerability fix, which originated by a non-decision made in 2001. If you have ANYTHING to do with security make sure you watch that video!

Link

Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 2: The Cathedral & The Bazaar

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

This post is part of a series. you’d probably like to read it from the beginning. You may also be interested in the next part of the series.

 

As a paraphrase on Eric Raymond’s famous book under the same title (O’reilly ,open format) let us, for a moment, think of the church as a computing system. The  service (no pun intended) is led by the priest, and has a single, general, output, it is very reliable (when comparing to other medieval services) but given under very strict terms (start time, end time, location, donation). If you don’t like your town’s priest, the next best option (if you are a medieval peasant)  probably involved some serious walking and certainly was not the safest things you could do in your day off (how’s that for a captive audience?) .

The Bazaar, On the other hand is a whole different animal Continue reading “Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 2: The Cathedral & The Bazaar”

Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 2: The Cathedral & The Bazaar