Why client-server must die | InfoWorld

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

Old models of computing always tend to linger too long, but client-server was based on a fallacy — and needs to go away sooner rather than later

Source: Why client-server must die | InfoWorld

Link

The Trade – 4 ways to (Eventually) do the right thing

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

To every decision there is a dark side, this an unshakable fact of life.

  • The bus is cheaper than a car but takes more time.
  • Going for a run is good for your health, but you my get injured
  • Having a smart phone enables you to work from everywhere, but you may end up working from everywhere

Tech in that perspective is no different, you often hear about “premature optimization”1 and “design bugs”2. These are merely bad choices – made without understanding the trade offs  between the available options. It gets worse, Continue reading “The Trade – 4 ways to (Eventually) do the right thing”

The Trade – 4 ways to (Eventually) do the right thing

Painless Functional Specifications – Part 1: Why Bother? – Joel on Software

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

Three giant, important reasons why you need to write good specs – and the real reason why people don’t.

Source: Painless Functional Specifications – Part 1: Why Bother? – Joel on Software

Joel Spolsky explains why you really shouldn’t write even a single line of code before you wrote the specs (rudimentary as they may be). ’nuff said.

Link

The Art of Readable Code – a recomendation

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

The Art of Readable Code (Theory in Practice) , Dustin Boswell, Trevor Foucher

As programmers, we’ve all seen source code that’s so ugly and buggy it makes our brain ache. Over the past five years, authors Dustin Boswell and Trevor Foucher have analyzed hundreds of examples of “bad code” (much of it their own) to determine why they’re bad and how they could be improved. Their conclusion? You need to write code that minimizes the time it would take someone else to understand it—even if that someone else is you.

Continue reading “The Art of Readable Code – a recomendation”

Link

Must Not Fail

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

No system is fault-proof, but high volume, high velocity and high throughput (or whichever flavor of HPC you practice toady) systems often are expected to be. Every time we state otherwise we either lie to our clients, our colleagues, or worse – ourselves.

Continue reading “Must Not Fail”

Must Not Fail

mapped out

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

The last couple of weeks I slaved over refactoring some of the code-base of one of our costumers. The task at hand was to take the elaborate spaghetti code, build with way (waaaay) too many multiprocessing queues and  turn it into a functioning, debugable, decently performing  piece of software.

As it turns out, most of the work is embarrassingly parallel1 but with all the different processes handling all the different tasks the code is unmaintainable. So off we went, trying to find more subtle routs to multiprocess  our way out of the mess.

It was clear. we needed a map. Not the of the paper kind, not even of the google kind2, but of the parallel kind.

Continue reading “mapped out”

mapped out

Matching Wildcards: An Empirical Way to Tame an Algorithm

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

Optimizing and testing a wildcard algorithm to get 5x performance improvement.

Source: Matching Wildcards: An Empirical Way to Tame an Algorithm | Dr Dobb’s

Link