“play with it”, “quick feedback” and “binary debugging”

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

There is a lot of talk in the tech industry about the performance of developers. You can hear plenty about the role of a talent, experience, and motivation. “Be a talent scout!”, “We hire only seniors”, “Give them equity” …

https://blog.daftcode.pl/the-secret-of-high-performing-developers-c3c41966eca9

 

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Geo-spatial in-memory caching using Rtree

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

Having to save a lot of geo-spatial data is a task rarely one passes without being scared for one’s life. Whether you are using a DB like postGIS, an in-memory data store like geoRedis or some other tool, handling geo-spatial data usually mean using RTree. Using RTree directly can ave some very positive effects on your system performance, so we thought we’ll let you in on this industry secret. Continue reading “Geo-spatial in-memory caching using Rtree”

Geo-spatial in-memory caching using Rtree

Logging Geo-Spatial-Data to ELK from Python

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

Kibana, on paper, offers a beautiful and easy way to inspect your geo data on a dashboard widget out of the box. This is all very well until you try to use that feature from python, only to find out that the Logstash lib automatically maps all of these geo-point type fields to string. Mapping in ES is no child’s play but even solving mapping issues* didn’t completely made the problem go away.

Continue reading “Logging Geo-Spatial-Data to ELK from Python”

Logging Geo-Spatial-Data to ELK from Python

better event-driven programming using flexible state

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

This is a true relic- the few who can spend the time and read it will be rewarded with the gift of understanding state. Using the complex example of…. a calculator:

At first glance, this approach seems to work just fine. Indeed, when you launch the calculator (available for download at <www.cuj.com/code>), you will certainly find out that most of the time it correctly adds, subtracts, multiplies, and divides. What’s there not to like? However, play with the application for a while longer, and you’ll discover many corner cases in which the calculator provides misleading results, freezes, or crashes altogether.

Source: Who Moved My State? | Dr Dobb’s

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Zopfli Optimization: Free Bandwidth (?)

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

Source: Zopfli Optimization: Literally Free Bandwidth

This is a little off subject, but space (= bandwidth) optimization is just as important as algorithmic optimization. That said – there is a cost to applying compression solutions globally in your system, as this article gently notes. Handle with care.

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The Art of Readable Code – a recomendation

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

The Art of Readable Code (Theory in Practice) , Dustin Boswell, Trevor Foucher

As programmers, we’ve all seen source code that’s so ugly and buggy it makes our brain ache. Over the past five years, authors Dustin Boswell and Trevor Foucher have analyzed hundreds of examples of “bad code” (much of it their own) to determine why they’re bad and how they could be improved. Their conclusion? You need to write code that minimizes the time it would take someone else to understand it—even if that someone else is you.

Continue reading “The Art of Readable Code – a recomendation”

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mapped out

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

The last couple of weeks I slaved over refactoring some of the code-base of one of our costumers. The task at hand was to take the elaborate spaghetti code, build with way (waaaay) too many multiprocessing queues and  turn it into a functioning, debugable, decently performing  piece of software.

As it turns out, most of the work is embarrassingly parallel1 but with all the different processes handling all the different tasks the code is unmaintainable. So off we went, trying to find more subtle routs to multiprocess  our way out of the mess.

It was clear. we needed a map. Not the of the paper kind, not even of the google kind2, but of the parallel kind.

Continue reading “mapped out”

mapped out