Logging Geo-Spatial-Data to ELK from Python

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

Kibana, on paper, offers a beautiful and easy way to inspect your geo data on a dashboard widget out of the box. This is all very well until you try to use that feature from python, only to find out that the Logstash lib automatically maps all of these geo-point type fields to string. Mapping in ES is no child’s play but even solving mapping issues* didn’t completely made the problem go away.

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Logging Geo-Spatial-Data to ELK from Python

mapped out

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

The last couple of weeks I slaved over refactoring some of the code-base of one of our costumers. The task at hand was to take the elaborate spaghetti code, build with way (waaaay) too many multiprocessing queues and  turn it into a functioning, debugable, decently performing  piece of software.

As it turns out, most of the work is embarrassingly parallel1 but with all the different processes handling all the different tasks the code is unmaintainable. So off we went, trying to find more subtle routs to multiprocess  our way out of the mess.

It was clear. we needed a map. Not the of the paper kind, not even of the google kind2, but of the parallel kind.

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mapped out

Tracing Python memory leaks

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

… It’s not so easy for a Python application to leak memory. Usually there are three scenarios …

Source: LShift – Tracing Python memory leaks

Just used the method in this article to solve a stochastic app crush problem for a client. How would imagine setting some global variables is more than just typing global in random places around your code base.

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Link: The Anatomy of a Critical Security Bug

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

For those of you who don’t know, the last WordPress release was about more than just Emoji support. Yesterday a post was published on Post status about a talk by Andrew Nacin (the lead developer @ WordPress) on the subject explaining the ins and outs of a ~2 year old vulnerability fix, which originated by a non-decision made in 2001. If you have ANYTHING to do with security make sure you watch that video!

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