Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 6: The Service

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

This post is part of a series. you’d probably like to read it from the beginning. Or check out the previous post in the series

If you have any experience with software developers, and I assume you do, you would know that we are prone to religion wars – windows vs. linux, python vs. js, visual studio vs. sublime vs. emacs vs. vim, even DC vs Marvel. Just name an idea or a product and sit back and watch us preach for hours on end why it’s either the most awesome thing in existence (or a steaming pile of out of date tyrannosaurus manure).

Taking that into account, it’s no surprise that a questions like “is SOA good or bad?” have been sending architects, engineers and programmers to the ring to try and punch a decision out of each other since the biblical times (someone had to engineer the shit out of those pyramids). The bell rings, we’re up! Continue reading “Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 6: The Service”

Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 6: The Service

Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 2: The Cathedral & The Bazaar

Adam Lev-Libfeld

A long distance runner, a software architect, an HPC nerd (order may change).

Latest posts by Adam Lev-Libfeld (see all)

This post is part of a series. you’d probably like to read it from the beginning. You may also be interested in the next part of the series.

 

As a paraphrase on Eric Raymond’s famous book under the same title (O’reilly ,open format) let us, for a moment, think of the church as a computing system. The  service (no pun intended) is led by the priest, and has a single, general, output, it is very reliable (when comparing to other medieval services) but given under very strict terms (start time, end time, location, donation). If you don’t like your town’s priest, the next best option (if you are a medieval peasant)  probably involved some serious walking and certainly was not the safest things you could do in your day off (how’s that for a captive audience?) .

The Bazaar, On the other hand is a whole different animal Continue reading “Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 2: The Cathedral & The Bazaar”

Breaking the monolith – How to design your system for both flexibility and scale – Part 2: The Cathedral & The Bazaar